Functional design of a wind turbine © Von Arne Nordmann (norro) - Own illustration. Using Image:Schema eolienne.svg, Image:Windrad-Nahaufnahme.jpg, Image:WindPropBlade.jpg and [1] and containing High_voltage_warning.svg., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1708454, edited by Siemens Stiftung CC BY-SA 3.0

Functional design of a wind turbine

Image

Graphic:
The complete structure of a wind turbine including its base and tower is illustrated schematically.

English, Spanish, German
Image (73.7 kByte)
2020-03-17
The foundation serves to anchor the wind power plant in the ground. To guarantee the stability of the wind turbine, a pile or flat foundation is constructed depending on the firmness of the ground.
The tower is the largest and heaviest component of a wind turbine. It is usually between 1 and 1.8 times longer than the rotor diameter and can weigh several hundred tonnes. The tower structure itself not only supports the mass of the nacelle and rotor blades, but must also absorb the enormous static loads caused by the varying wind forces. Tubular constructions assembled from stackable concrete or steel segments are generally used. The tower height or hub height is between approximately 120 m and 130 m for an output of approximately 3 MW to 6 MW and with a rotor diameter of approximately 110 m to 130 m.
The rotor is the component that converts the energy contained in the wind to mechanical rotary motion using the rotor blades.
The nacelle with the machinery train (drive train) contains the entire generating unit. (The functions are described in detail in the “Wind turbine – inside view” medium!)

Information and ideas:
Physics class could be used to explain why wind currents passing through the rotor blades cause them to move (flow principle of Venturi and Bernoulli).
Illustration
Physics; Technology
Grade 5 to 6; Grade 7 to 9; Grade 10 to 13
Middle/high school; Vocational training
Energy; Power generation; Renewable energy; Wind power plant
Media portal of the Siemens Stiftung
Von Arne Nordmann (norro) - Own illustration. Using Image:Schema eolienne.svg, Image:Windrad-Nahaufnahme.jpg, Image:WindPropBlade.jpg and [1] and containing High_voltage_warning.svg., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1708454, edited by Siemens Stiftung
© Von Arne Nordmann (norro) - Own illustration. Using Image:Schema eolienne.svg, Image:Windrad-Nahaufnahme.jpg, Image:WindPropBlade.jpg and [1] and containing High_voltage_warning.svg., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1708454, edited by Siemens Stiftung
Stay up-to-date!

About four times a year, we inform you about new media on this portal as well as current studies and events related to OER and STEM.

Media Portal newsletter – register now

About four times a year, we inform you about new media on this portal as well as current studies and events related to OER and STEM.

*Required fields


Language